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Carolyn B. Allen, Ph.D.

Carolyn B. Allen, Ph.D.


Retired Professor and Lecturer
Courses Taught: Chemistry in Today's Society (CHEM 1111, 1111L, 1112, 1112L)




cballen@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 
Kathryn S. Asala, Ph. D.

Kathryn S. Asala, Ph. D.


Undergraduate Coordinator and Lecturer
Courses Taught: Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251, 1252)


Burson 220
704-687-0097
kasala@uncc.edu
Dr. Kathryn Asala's site
Research Focus:


 
Paul A. Bainbridge

Paul A. Bainbridge


Stockroom Manager
Research Technician


Burson 221A
704-687-5243
pabainbr@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 

Banita W. Brown


Courses Taught: Organic Synthesis (CHEM 4135/5135) Organic Structure (CHEM 4133) Organic Chemistry (CHEM 2131, 2131L, 2132, 2132L) Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251, 1252)





Research Focus: Syntheses of macrocyclic "lariat" polyethers containing various sidearms. Synthesis substituted pyrroles via transition metal mediated rearrangements of substituted cyclopropylimines.


 
Robin Burns

Robin Burns


Administrative Support Associate

Burson 200
704-687-5244
rburns3@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 

Stewart Fowler Bush, Ph. D


Emeritus Professor
Physical Chemistry


sfbush@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 

Clifford M. Carlin, Ph. D.


Lecturer
Courses Taught: Special Topics and Investigations (CHEM 6060)

Chemical Instrumentation Specialist
Burson 229
704-687-0098
cmcarlin@uncc.edu
Dr. Clifford Carlin's site
Research Focus:


 
Brian T. Cooper, Ph. D.

Brian T. Cooper, Ph. D.


Associate Professor
Courses Taught: Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251) Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1252) Quantitative Analysis (CHEM 3111 ) Instrumental Analysis and Lab (CHEM 4111/4111L) Protein Analysis by MALDI-M.S. (CHEM 4090/5090) Mass Spectrometry (CHEM 6115)

Analytical Chemistry
Burson 142
704-687-8050
btcooper@uncc.edu
Dr. Brian Cooper's site
Research Focus: My research group primarily uses capillary electrophoresis (CE) to analyze and characterize proteins. Capillary electrophoretic separations of protein "charge ladders" (otherwise pure proteins with intrinsic or induced charge heterogeneity) allow us to estimate the net charge and hydrodynamic radius of proteins in solution. We also study ligand binding to proteins using "affinity capillary electrophoresis" (ACE), which exploits the accompanying change in protein electrophoretic mobility. Combining charge ladders and ACE allows us to characterize overall conformational changes caused by ligand binding. And with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection, we can study the conformational behavior of fluorescently labeled proteins under simulated intracellular conditions—especially in the presence of high concentrations of other macromolecules. We also have an active collaboration with a group in the Department of Bioinformatics and Genomics. We are using a variant of ACE called "CEMSA" (capillary electrophoretic mobility shift assay) to detect binding of transcription factors (TFs) to synthetic, fluorescently labeled DNA probes. We use this technique to experimentally validate predicted TF binding site sequences. After screening by CEMSA, we can identify affinity-purified TFs using mass spectrometry.


 
James C. Crosthwaite, Ph. D.

James C. Crosthwaite, Ph. D.


Emeritus Professor
Courses Taught: Organic Chemistry (CHEM 2131, 2131L, 2132)

Organic Chemistry


jccrosth@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 
Bernadette T. Donovan-Merkert, Ph. D.

Bernadette T. Donovan-Merkert, Ph. D.


Professor & Chair Analytical Chemistry
Courses Taught: Freshman Seminar (ARSC 1000) Science, Technology and Society (LBST 2219) Quantitative Analysis (CHEM 3111) Survey of Instrumental Methods of Analysis (CHEM 3113) Instrumental Methods (CHEM 4111) Advanced Analytical Chemistry – Practical NMR Spectroscopy (CHEM 6115) Advanced Analytical Chemistry – Electrochemistry (CHEM 6115) Organometallic Chemistry (CHEM 6126) Perspectives at the Nanoscale (NANO 8001) Introduction to Instrumentation and Processing at the Nanoscale (NANO 8101)

Analytical Chemistry
Burson 200
704-687-1300
bdonovan@uncc.edu
Donovan-Merkert Group Home Page
Research Focus: My research program focuses on electron-transfer reactions of organometallic complexes. By oxidizing or reducing these compounds we often generate species that undergo interesting reactions or form complexes in unusual oxidation states. In many cases redox activation of organometallic complexes accelerates known reactions of these compounds, activates otherwise inert complexes, or allows reactions to occur under milder conditions. We study the reactions and their products using electrochemical methods and other instrumental techniques including, but not limited to, NMR, IR, ESR and GC/M.S.. A major area of current investigation involves the use of electrochemistry to promote asymmetric transformations. Our work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, the Petroleum Research Foundation and Research Corporation.


 
Thomas D. DuBois, Ph. D.

Thomas D. DuBois, Ph. D.


Emeritus Professor
Charles H. Stone Professor of Chemistry
Courses Taught: Theroretical Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 6125) Computational Chemistry (CHEM 5200/4200) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 4121/5121) Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 2125) Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251. 1252)

Inorganic Chemistry


tddubois@uncc.edu
DuBois Group Home Page
Research Focus: Computational chemistry, computational materials and Supercomputing. - Lewis acid-base reaction chemistry and inorganic cluster compounds. - Photopolymers, photochemistry and lithography. - Materials processing and plasma chemistry. - Inorganic polymers and materials having unusual electronic properties. - Homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal catalysts. - Microelectronic and Micromechanical Systems.


 
Markus Etzkorn, Ph. D.

Markus Etzkorn, Ph. D.


Associate Professor
Courses Taught: CHEM 2131 - Organic Chemistry CHEM 2132 - Organic Chemistry II CHEM 6135 – Advanced Organic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry
Burson 268
704-687-1468
metzkorn@uncc.edu
Research Group
Research Focus: a) The Etzkorn group targets fluorinated molecular tweezers of different molecular architecture in a convergent approach from various tether scaffolds and fluoroarene building blocks. The introduction of fluorine substituents in the arene pincers alters the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) in the binding cavity - in contrast to almost all known molecular tweezers the MEP is inverted - and thus induces a selectivity for electron-rich guests, e.g., electron-rich arenes or anions. The non-covalent p-p and anion-p interactions between the tweezers and guest units are of fundamental importance in supramolecular chemistry with potential applications in biology, chemistry and their interface. Novel fluorinated molecular tweezers will therefore significantly expand experimental data for molecular recognition that is based on the aforementioned supramolecular binding motifs. Ultimately we target sensing and sequestration of biologically important and environmentally hazardous species, respectively. b) Strained cage hydrocarbons have traditionally played an important role in (physical) organic chemistry and the group investigates neglected cage olefins. The study of their photochemistry toward more complex structures, the reactivity mode of the olefin units (1,2-; 1,4- vs. laticyclic addition) as well as the preparation of new organometallic complexes are central topics of our endeavors.


 
Richard L. Jew, Ph. D.

Richard L. Jew, Ph. D.


Lecturer
Courses Taught: Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251)

General Chemistry
Burson 224
704-687-1605
rjew1@uncc.edu
Dr. Richard Jew's site
Research Focus:


 
Daniel S. Jones, Ph. D.

Daniel S. Jones, Ph. D.


Associate Professor
Courses Taught: Physical Chemistry (CHEM 3141, 3142) Survey of Physical Chemistry (CHEM 2141) General Chemistry (CHEM 1203, 1204)

Physical Chemistry
Burson 266
704-687-0992
djones@uncc.edu
Jones Research Home Page
Research Focus: X-ray Crystallography: Determination of molecular structures by X-ray crystallographic methods. The technique of single-crystal X-ray crystallography can be used to determine the detailed molecular structure of chemical compounds. Because this is a completely general method, it can be applied to almost any compound of chemical interest, and is thus an important tool in many different areas of research. The determination of a substance's structure by X-ray methods involves several steps, including 1) preparation of suitable crystals for study, 2) preliminary X-ray investigation for the determination of crystal quality and lattice type, 3) collection of high accuracy intensity data on an automated X-ray diffractometer, and 4) reduction and analysis of the data utilizing high-speed computers. Structure determinations are carried out on compounds of interest in a variety of research endeavors; the particular compounds studied often depend on the immediate research interests of faculty colleagues. Compounds recently studied include templates for the synthesis of chiral organic compounds, and both mononuclear and polymeric transition metal complexes.


 
Marcus Jones, Ph. D.

Marcus Jones, Ph. D.


Assistant Professor
Physical Chemistry
Burson 138
704-687-7852
Marcus.Jones@uncc.edu
Group website
Research Focus: We are interested in understanding photo-induced excitation dynamics in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). These colloidal materials hold tremendous potential for low-cost processing and high-efficiency solar energy conversion. This is due to their size-tunable absorption thresholds and high photo-stability. In addition, some quantum confined NCs display an electron-hole pair generation phenomenon with greater than 100% quantum yield, called “multiple exciton generation” (MEG). These materials could be used to develop solar cells with efficiencies that exceed the 33.7% limiting value for conventional materials.


 
Joanna K. Krueger, Ph. D.

Joanna K. Krueger, Ph. D.


Associate Professor
Advanced Biochemistry (CHEM6185/8165) Biochemical Principles (CHEM 6101/8101) Principles of Biochemistry I (CHEM 4165/5165) Principles of Biochemistry II (CHEM 4166/5166) Biochemical Instrumentation (CHEM 4171/5171)

Biochemistry
Burson 144
704-687-1642
jkkruege@uncc.edu
Krueger Group Website
Research Focus: Biophysical Chemistry: Structural information on biomolecular associations using the techniques of small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, chemical cross-linking with peptide analysis by M.S., selected-site mutagenesis and spectroscopy (FTIR, CD, UV-VIS); and visualized through the use of molecular modeling.


 
Vladimir S. Kubalik

Vladimir S. Kubalik


Research Operations Manager

Burson 170
704-687-5426
vskubali@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 
Jon W. Merkert, Ph. D.

Jon W. Merkert, Ph. D.


Senior Instrument Analyst
Courses Taught: Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251, 1252) Chemistry Seminar (CHEM 4695, 4696) Special Topics and Investigations (CHEM 6060)


Burson 226
704-687-1656
jmerkert@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 
Susan K. Michael, M.S.

Susan K. Michael, M.S.


Lecturer
Courses Taught: General Chemistry (CHEM 1203) Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251, 1252) Organic Chemistry (CHEM 2131L, 2132L)

General and Organic Chemistry
Burson 140
704-687-1660
smichael@uncc.edu
Susan Michael's site
Research Focus:


 
Michael D. Murphy, Ph. D.

Michael D. Murphy, Ph. D.


Lecturer
Courses Taught: Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251/1252) Survey of Physical Chemistry (CHEM 2141) Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM 3111) Survey of Instrumental Methods Laboratory (CHEM 3113) Physical Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM 3141/3142) Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (CHEM 4111)

Physical and Analytical Chemistry
Burson 139
704-687-1662
mmurphy@uncc.edu
Dr. Michael Murphy's site
Research Focus: My research interests are related to the investigation of dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Past work includes the study of molecular rotation in crystalline solids, chain dynamics in amorphous polymers, and rate studies of exchanging spin systems. Current interests include reaction kinetics of anionic polymerizations and structural determinations of reaction intermediates in organocuprate addition reactions.


 
Craig A. Ogle, Ph. D.

Craig A. Ogle, Ph. D.


Professor & Director of Regional Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (RACheL)
Courses Taught: Advanced Organic Chemistry (CHEM 6135) Organic Chemistry (CHEM 2131 & CHEM 2132) Organic Structure Determination (CHEM 4133) Organic Reaction Mechanisms (CHEM 4134)

Organic Chemistry
Burson 250

cogle@uncc.edu
Ogle Group Home Page
Research Focus: My research has centered on the preparation, reaction and structure of carbanionic species. We are currently preparing organometallic reagents as chiral auxiliaries for organic synthesis. We are preparing functional monomers for preparing functional polymers. We are using the rapid injection NMR technique to help understand the mechanisms for organometallic conjugate addition reactions.


 
John H. Pickett, Ph. D.

John H. Pickett, Ph. D.


Research Scientist Regional Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (RACheL)

Burson 145
704-687-0969
jhpicket@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 
Jordan C. Poler, Ph. D.

Jordan C. Poler, Ph. D.


Associate Professor
Courses Taught: General Chemistry (CHEM 1251, 1252) Physical Chemistry (CHEM 3141, 3141L, 3142, 3142L) Surfaces and Interfaces of Materials Chemistry (CHEM 6082) Nanoscale Phenomena (NANO 8102)

Physical Chemistry
Burson 143
704-687-8289
jcpoler@uncc.edu
Poler Group Home Page
Research Focus: Most of my research interests are materials related. My efforts are toward the fundamental studies of complex systems at the nanoscale with regard to applications of materials at the macroscale. Complex systems exist at surfaces, interfaces and thin films. The experimental techniques that I use to study these systems are both optically and electronically based. Scanning probe microscopies are the work-horses of my research. In particular, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and the newly developed scanning thermopower microscope (STPM) are central in my studies of surfaces and interfaces. The complex systems that are of most interest to me are in the areas of both; "hard" materials (e.g. nanotubes, nanoparticles, semiconductors and metals) and "soft" materials (e.g. self-assembled monolayers, biologically interesting molecules and Langmuir films).


 
Daniel Rabinovich, Ph. D.

Daniel Rabinovich, Ph. D.


Professor Inorganic Chemistry
Teaching: Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251) Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 2125) Science, Technology and Society (LBST 2213) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 4121) Organometallic Chemistry (CHEM 6126)

Inorganic Chemistry
Burson 232
704-687-5105
drabinov@uncc.edu
Rabinovich Group Home Page
Research Focus: Synthetic and structural inorganic, bioinorganic and organometallic chemistry, including: (i) poly(pyrazolyl)silane chemistry, (ii) coordination chemistry with multidentate sulfur-donor ligands, including polythioethers and poly(mercaptoimidazolyl)borates, (iii) synthesis of model compounds for the active sites in nickel hydrogenases, copper proteins and other sulfur-rich biomolecules, and (iv) microwave-assisted coordination chemistry. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Research Corporation, the American Chemical Society's Petroleum Research Fund, and the National Science Foundation have generously supported our work in recent years.


 
John M. Risley, Ph. D.

John M. Risley, Ph. D.


Professor
Courses Taught: Advanced Biochemistry (CHEM 8165,CHEM 6165) Biochemical Principles (CHEM 6101, CHEM 8101) Special Topics in Biochemistry (CHEM 6060) Special Topics in Biochemistry (CHEM 5090) Biochemical Instrumentation (CHEM 4171) Principles of Biochemistry (CHEM 4165, 4165L, 4166) General Chemistry (CHEM 1203, 1203L, 1204, 1204L) Chemistry in Today's Society (CHEM 1111, 1112) Laboratory in Chemistry (CHEM 1111L, 1112L)

Biochemistry
Burson 236
704-687-5175
jmrisley@uncc.edu
Risley Group Home Page
Research Focus: I. Studies of Glycosylasparaginase, the Enzyme Involved in the Most Common Disorder of Glycoprotein Degradation The catabolism of glycoproteins to the constituent amino acids and monosaccharides involves many different enzymes. While the enzymes that hydrolyze the peptide bonds in the polypeptide chain to amino acids show a generally broad activity toward different amino acid side chains, the enzymes that hydrolyze the bonds between the sugars in the carbohydrate moieties of glycoproteins generally have a high degree of specificity. A key enzyme in the catabolism of N-linked carbohydrate moieties is glycosylasparaginase, which hydrolyzes the amide bond between asparagine and N-acetylglucosamine to give aspartic acid and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-b-D-glucopyranosylamine. A decrease in activity of this enzyme gives rise to aspartylglycosaminuria, an inherited lysosomal storage disease, that leads to mental retardation and a shortened life span as the metabolite accumulates in cells, tissues, and body fluids. This disease has recently been recognized as the most common disorder of glycoprotein metabolism. There is no cure for the disorder. Mutations that give rise to the disorder have been elucidated and a crystal structure for the enzyme has been published. My lab is studying the fundamental physical and kinetic properties of the enzyme. We synthesize potential substrate analogues for the enzyme, inhibitors, possible suicide substrates, and transition-state analogues, and study their properties with the enzyme. We are also using molecular modeling of the enzyme in order to study various properties. II. The 18O Isotope Shift in NMR. NMR spectroscopy is a very important analytical tool in chemistry. It is used in almost all areas of chemistry, including analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. One small area, and specialization, of study in NMR is the effect of isotopes on NMR active nuclei. Oxygen has three naturally-occurring isotopes, 16O, 17O and 18O; 16O is the most abundant at 99+%. Two NMR-active nuclei that are in important oxygen-containing compounds are 13C and 31P. The NMR signals of 13C and 31P have slightly different chemical shifts when bonded to 16O and 18O; the differences are very small - a few ppb (parts per billion) - but can be readily detected when the NMR spectrometer is correctly set up. We are using these 18O isotope shifts in 13C NMR and 31P NMR to study reactions and properties of molecules.


 
Thomas A. Schmedake, Ph. D.

Thomas A. Schmedake, Ph. D.


Associate Professor
Inorganic Chemistry
Burson 264
704-687-5177
tschmeda@uncc.edu
Research Group Page
Research Focus: Synthesis of novel silicon containing compounds and materials, especially compounds or complexes in which silicon is used as a substitute for a carbon atom or a transition metal. Specific focus areas include redox-active hexacoordinate silicon complexes, silicon heterocycles, and silicon-based conducting polymers.


 
Linda J. Spurrier

Linda J. Spurrier


Business Manager

Burson 240
704-687-5533
ljspurri@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 
Caryn D. Striplin, Ph. D.

Caryn D. Striplin, Ph. D.


Lecturer
Courses Taught: Principles of Chemistry (CHEM 1251, 1252) General Chemistry (CHEM 1203) Organic Chemistry (CHEM 2131L) Biochemistry (CHEM 4165L)

General Chemistry
Burson 141
704-687-5179
cdstripl@uncc.edu
Dr. Caryn D. Striplin site
Research Focus:


 
Jerry (Jay) Troutman, Ph. D.

Jerry (Jay) Troutman, Ph. D.


Assistant Professor
Biochemistry
Burson 262
704-687-5180
Jerry.Troutman@uncc.edu
Research Page
Research Focus: Bacterial Polysaccharides: Here we will attempt to understand the biochemistry of polymeric sugars called polysaccharides that coat the surface of specific bacteria, and play an important role in interactions between symbiotic gut microbes and their mammalian hosts.


 
Juan Luis Vivero-Escoto, Ph. D.

Juan Luis Vivero-Escoto, Ph. D.


Assistant Professor
Organic/Materials Chemistry
Burson 258
704-687-5239
jviveroe@uncc.edu
Research Group Website
Research Focus: Research Focus: Research in our group focuses on the design, and synthesis of novel hybrid inorganic-organic materials for a wide variety of applications, predominantly in biomedicine, renewable energy, and catalysis. Our approach is multidisciplinary, interfacing chemistry, biology, and material science. By its very nature our research will provide an excellent training environment for undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral research fellows. Students in our group are exposed to and trained in synthesis and characterization of small molecules (organic and inorganic alike), polymers, and nanomaterials. Specific techniques they learn include, but not limited to, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), absorption and emission spectroscopies, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission and scanning electron microscopies (TEM and SEM); and basic cell culture and characterization techniques. Listed below are the three main research projects we are pursuing: - Multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles as a delivery platform for photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. - Boronic acid-based nanoscale coordination polymers as novel metal/covalent organic frameworks with potential applications in drug delivery. - Hierarchically assembled titania-phosphonate dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles with potential application in photocatalysis.


 

Thomas D. Walsh, Ph. D.


Emeritus Professor
Organic Chemistry


tdwalsh@uncc.edu

Research Focus:


 
DR. Michael Walter

Michael G. Walter, Ph. D.


Assistant Professor
Organic/Materials Chemistry
Burson 254
704-687-8291
Michael.Walter@uncc.edu
Walter Research Group
Research Focus: Research in the Walter lab focuses on the synthesis and integration of organic conjugated polymers and dye molecules for solar energy conversion applications. Nature accomplishes the task of solar energy conversion by using molecular systems to direct photoinduced reactions that ultimately store solar energy in the form of chemical bonds. We attempt to mimic these processes by designing materials that absorb solar photons and efficiently convert them into electricity or fuels such as hydrogen. Organic semiconductors are desirable for these applications because they offer the potential for an inexpensively processed, lightweight, and flexible photoactive material. Unique to this effort is the development of new porphyrin and corrole macrocyclic dyes that exhibit interesting optoelectronic properties. Characterization of the fundamental photoinduced electron transfer properties of synthesized materials is conducted using photoelectrochemical techniques, spectroscopy, and device integration. New, promising light absorbing systems are studied in polymer solar cell and in dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cell configurations. In addition, efforts are made to tune photoinduced electron transfer mechanisms at organic and inorganic interfaces through molecular design and nanostructure. One of the ultimate goals of these efforts is the design of an artificial photosynthetic system that uses inexpensive molecular semiconductors and catalysts to convert water and carbon dioxide into usable fuels such as hydrogen and methanol. The advancement of this field rests on the discovery of new organic semiconductors, a field where synthetic organic chemists can contribute in a significant way.


 
Dewey R. Williams

Dewey R. Williams


Laboratory Manager
Research Operations Manager


Burson 219
704-687-5532
williams@uncc.edu

Research Focus: